Team

Researchers

Sven Oskarsson, Professor of Political Science and project leader of CONPOL, received his PhD in 2003 from the Department of Government, Uppsala University. His research interests include political behavior, social science genomics, and methods and his previous work has appeared in journals such as American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Political Behavior, Nature and Behavior Genetics. Apart from the CONPOL project he is currently leading a research project focusing on how gene-environment interactions shape social, economic and political attitudes and behavior. See personal website.

 

Karl-Oskar Lindgren, Associate Professor of Political Science and senior researcher in the CONPOL project, received his PhD in 2006 from the Department of Government, Uppsala University. His research interests include political behavior, representative democracy, and EU-politics and his previous work has appeared in journals such as American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, and European Union Politics. He is currently leading two research projects, one focusing on the transmission of political inequality between generations and the other on the relationship between political participation and labor market status. See personal website.

 

Linuz Aggeborn, researcher in the CONPOL project, received his PhD in 2016 from the Department of Economics, Uppsala University. His research interests includes political behavior and political participation in general. Linuz Aggeborn is also involved in other research programs at Uppsala University with the focus on labor and health economics.

 

 

r Nyman, researcher in the CONPOL project, received his PhD in 2016 from the Department of Government, Uppsala University.His research concern political participation, with a focus on voter mobilization and political representation, but also questions about how we should understand purported trade-offs between electoral incentives and policy-making for the long term. Before his career in academia, he worked as an economist at the Swedish Fiscal Policy Council. See personal website.

 

Henrik Andersson, postdoc in the CONPOL project, received his PhD in 2018 from the Department of Economics, Uppsala University. He works in applied economics, in particular in political, urban and public economics. He is especially interested in questions related to the causes and effects of international migration. Henrik is also affiliated with the Uppsala center for labor studies (UCLS) and Uppsala center for fiscal studies (UCFS). He received a 3-year Wallander stipend in 2018. See personal website.

 

Sirus Dehdari, postdoc in the CONPOL project, received his PhD in 2018 from the Institute for International Economic Studies, Stockholm University. He works in applied econometrics, and political and institutional economics, in particular political participation, identity formation, and the rise of the radical right. Sirus is also affiliated with the Swedish Institute for Social Research at Stockholm University and received a 3-year Wallander stipend in 2018. See personal website.

 

Rafael Ahlskog, postdoc in the CONPOL project, received his PhD in 2017 from the Department of Government, Uppsala University. His current work concerns mainly political behavior and attitudes, with a special focus on how genes and environment interact in shaping these complex traits. Previously he has done research on the role of altruism in vaccination policy design, and on the fiscal consequences of migration. See personal website.

 

 

Michal Smrek, researcher in the CONPOL project, received his PhD in 2019 from the Department of Government, Uppsala. University. In his PhD dissertation, he examined the effects of legislators’ electoral and political performance on their ballot placement. Within the CONPOL project, Michal will examine the potential spillover effects of one’s political fortunes on political engagement of one’s family and close friends.

 

 

Anders Larsson, programmer in the CONPOL project, received his PhD in systematic biology 2015 from the Department of Organismal Biology , Uppsala University. Currently he is employed as a systems developer at the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology at Uppsala University.

 

 

Affiliated researchers

Nazita Lajevardi, Assistant Professor at the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, received her PhD 2017 from the University of California, San Diego. Formerly, she was a postdoc on the CONPOL project in 2017, and continues to be an affiliated researcher. As a political scientist and attorney, her work is related to race and ethnic politics, political behavior, voting rights, and immigration. Her research lies at the intersection of religion, race, ethnic politics, representation, and discrimination. Broadly, she examines one overarching question: How do marginalized groups fare under western democracies? Her scholarship has been published in venues, such as The Journal of Politics, American Political Science Review, Political Behavior, Journal of Race and Ethnic Politics, and Politics Groups and Identities, among others. It has also been featured in the popular media, including The Atlantic, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Vox Magazine, and The Huffington Post. See personal website.

 

Christopher Dawes, Associate Professor at the Wilf Family Department of Politics at New York University, received his PhD 2011 from the University of California, San Diego. His research explores the fundamental question of why some individuals participate in politics while others do not. His research has been published in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Nature, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. See personal website.

 

Daniel Rubenson, Associate Professor at the Department of Politics at Ryerson University, Toronto, received his PhD 2006 from London School of Economics. He is co-Principle Investigator of the Canadian Election Study and of the Consortium on Electoral Democracy. Daniel’s research is in comparative politics and behavioural political economy. He uses field experiments to study questions related to political participation, persuasion, voting, trust and prosocial attitudes and behaviour. His work has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, The Economic Journal and Electoral Studies among others. See personal website.

 

Research assistants

Vinicius Ribeiro is a research assistant in the CONPOL project. He is a graduated Master of Science in Politics and International Studies from Uppsala University (2015) and holds two Bachelor of Arts degrees – one in Political Science and another in International Studies – from Miami University, USA (2011).

 

Andrés Gómez Tarazona is a research assistant in the CONPOL project. He is a graduated Master of Science in Anthopology, journalist and documentary film maker.